Sleep disturbances have been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease in men.

A study published in the journal Neurology found that elderly men with self-reported sleep disturbances have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men without self-reported sleep disturbances.

‘We show that men with self-reported sleep disturbances have a 1.5-fold higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men without sleep disturbance reports over a 40-year period,’ said lead researcher Christian Benedict of Uppsala University in Sweden.
‘The later the self-reported sleep disturbance was discovered, the greater the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease was,’ Benedict added.

Between 1970 and 2010, the researchers followed over 1,000 men, all of whom were 50 years old at the time.
According to the findings, getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis may benefit men’s brain health.
‘These findings suggest that strategies aimed at improving late-life sleep quality may help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease,’ Benedict said.

The researchers also mentioned that certain lifestyle factors, such as exercise, can have an impact on the health of the brain.
‘As a result, it must be remembered that a multifaceted lifestyle approach that includes good sleep habits is essential for maintaining brain health as you age,’ Benedict emphasised.
The findings were published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

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